delete
Four Simple SPSS Syntax Tips

Four Simple SPSS Syntax Tips

Here are four useful tips for writing shorter, more efficient SPSS syntax. 1. A simpler way to calculate scale totals. I often need to calculate a total score for questionnaires with multiple items. For example, I might ask participants to answer ten different questions, responding to each question using a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). In particular, I’ll often want to calculate an average of all ten items to use in statistical analyses. I used to calculate scale totals using the following SPSS syntax: COMPUTE vartotal = (var1 + var2 + var3 + var4...
delete
Converting an SPSS datafile to Mplus format

Converting an SPSS datafile to Mplus for...

Converting an SPSS datafile into a format readable by Mplus Mplus  is a fabulous statistical program. It’s very flexible, and is my favorite program to use when I need to analyze data using structural equation modeling – and I definitely prefer it over AMOS software. The latter is easier to use because of the graphical user interface (GUI), but I often find myself running into software limitations (e.g., AMOS cannot use bootstrapping when there is missing data) and in complex models, I often find the GUI tends to get clunky, and visually cluttered. This said, Mplus is not...
delete
The Three Most Common Types of Hypotheses

The Three Most Common Types of Hypothese...

Simple main effects (i.e., X leads to Y) are usually not going to get you published. Main effects can be exciting in the early stages of research to show the existence of a new effect, but as a field matures the types of questions that scientists are trying to answer tend to become more nuanced and specific.  In this post, I’ll briefly describe the three most common kinds of hypotheses that expand upon simple main effects – at least, the most common ones I’ve seen in my research career in psychology – as well as providing some resources to help you learn about how to test...